Assessment finds no air quality issues following Squamish dock fire 

Full report being prepared for Vancouver Coastal Health and other agencies to review

click to enlarge PHOTO BY NANCY HAMILTON - WHERE THERE'S SMOKE A view of the Squamish Terminals dock fire, which erupted Thursday, April 16 and continued for three days.
  • Photo by Nancy Hamilton
  • WHERE THERE'S SMOKE A view of the Squamish Terminals dock fire, which erupted Thursday, April 16 and continued for three days.

Environmental monitoring in the aftermath of last week’s Squamish Terminals dock fire has found no potential air quality or deposition concerns.

In the wake of last Thursday’s chemical fire, which burned for three days after a dock made from wood pilings saturated with the preservative creosote caught fire, Squamish Terminals contracted Envirochem Services Inc. to test particulate samples throughout the community.

Preliminary results from three air samples and 10 deposition (i.e. surface wipe) samples were taken between April 19 and 21 and found “no potential air quality, deposition issues or concerns related to elevated levels of contaminants.”

The results, released Friday, April 24, were supported by real-time air quality monitoring data provided by B.C.’s Ministry of Environment, although they have not yet been officially reviewed by the applicable health agencies.

A full report is currently being prepared for Vancouver Coastal Health and other agencies to review.

The dock that caught fire was built in 1972, according to Squamish Terminals vice president Kim Stegeman, who said last week the condition of the 43-year-old structure would be part of the ongoing investigation into the blaze.

On Monday, April 20, Squamish Terminals said on its website that it would rebuild the dock to current industry standards, and would not use wood pilings.

Speaking of Squamish Terminals Fire, Squamish

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