Mountain News: Yellowstone's wolves and grizzlies spread 

click to enlarge FILE PHOTO - wildlife worry Wildlife officials in Montana are concerned conflicts between humans and grizzly bears and wolves may increase as the animal populations spread lateraly.
  • file photo
  • wildlife worry Wildlife officials in Montana are concerned conflicts between humans and grizzly bears and wolves may increase as the animal populations spread lateraly.

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Mike Shimkonis, broker associate with Telluride Properties, says that he believes November and December will continue the trend, because many sellers, for purposes of capital gains taxes, will want to close on sales by the end of the year. "I have a feeling we are going to see a huge number of closings in the last two weeks of December," he told The Telluride Watch.

Telluride real estate agent George Harvey also noted that Vail and Aspen had big months.

In Steamboat Springs and Routt County, foreclosure filings had been expected to increase. But Jeannie Whiddon, public trustee for the county, instead reports the pace of foreclosures has faltered significantly. At this pace, she told Steamboat Today, foreclosures could be down a third from 2011.

This same trend, if less pronounced, is occurring across Colorado, according to the Denver Post.

Cold weather nixes veggies

JACKSON, Wyo. — Is eating local food truly feasible in mountain towns where the growing season lasts something like a month, two months if frost comes late?

That's the debate in Wyoming, where several locals had the idea of creating a three-story greenhouse on a lot next to Jackson's municipal parking garage. They planned to employ disabled workers and sell the produce to local restaurants.

Seems like a wonderful idea. But is it practical?

"It's a pretty tricky climate to grow in,' said Dale Sharkey, co-owner of a farm called Cosmic Apple, in Victor, Idaho, about a half-hour drive away and in a place similarly high and cold.

The Jackson Hole News&Guide says that tomato grower to the south in Big Piney, which also gets cold and stays that way, says that growing through winter requires heat. If you don't have cheap fuel, your produce will cost a lot. The Jackson business, called Vertical Harvest, has budgeted $50,000 for electricity and heat.

And then, days grow short in winter. You might keep a plant alive, but will it grow? Again, perhaps, but with imported energy.

Will the restaurants pay a premium for locally grown produce? "The biggest issue I have with it is the amount of money that is being spent to potentially grow a bag of lettuce," said Ted Wells, owner of Alpenglow Farm in Victor, Idaho.

Restaurateur feeling heat

OURAY, Colo. — A much-loved restaurant in Ouray, the colorful old mining town at the gateway to the San Juan Mountains, is closed down. What's unusual is why.

Tim Tucker, a co-owner, said he has been ostracized in the community and sabotaged by employees because of his criminal history in the deepening past. In 1989 and 1990, he was convicted of sexual offenses against a minor.

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