Bear Update: 

Bear viewing monitors and educates

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More times than not bears overcome, adapt, and survive their injuries. Last fall in early October Marisa suffered an unknown injury during a three-day period when I did not observe her. When located she was limping, dragging her right foreleg. Her leg was not used for nearly a month.

During winter denning the injury, which was likely a fracture, healed but not completely straight. She continues to limp, but the leg now is at least weight-bearing.

Marisa is at least 15 years old. The bears cross the road and continue grazing in a dense carpet of dandelion flowers and horsetail. Our time with these large grazing mammals lasts over 35 minutes.

For many people who come on these tours, it is their best experience from British Columbia.

To go bear viewing please contact me with any questions at 604-902-1660 and contact Whistler Blackcomb reservations at 604-932-3434 (Press 2). Tours run 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. from May 15 to Oct 31.

Many thanks to people reporting their bear sightings. ItÕs interesting to see how residents and visitors to Whistler are progressing with their understanding and interpretation of bear activity. The bear count is up to 45 black bears (minimum number). If you are experiencing aggressive bear behavior or wish to report improperly stored garbage please call the BC Conservation Service at 1-800-663-WILD.

Aggressive behaviors are defined as bears approaching buildings, vehicles, and people. The root of human food-conditioning in Whistler bears is accessible garbage. It is crucial that we break this link and maintain consistent proactive bear proof management of human-food attractants.

Bear sightings can be reported to me at 604-902-1660 or e-mail mallen_coastbear@direct.ca Thanks to Pique Newsmagazine for sponsorship of Bear Update columns.

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