Cybernaut 

Windows XP

Windows XP has been around for over a month now, so I thought it might be a good time to talk about why it?s the best version of the worlds most popular operating system.

First of all, there?s some hometown pride here ? it was a well known secret that Windows XP was code named "Whistler" in its development due to the fondness that Microsoft execs have for our home town. Fewer people know that the next major upgrade for XP is code named "Longhorn," and the next version in the works after that is "Blackcomb."

Secondly, XP just works better.

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/home/howtobuy/choosing2.asp

Windows XP comes in two different versions: "Home" and "Professional". The only important differences between the two is that the Professional version supports dual processors, and has the ability to connect to a WinNT domain.

The basis of XP is that it is written as a 32-bit WinNT kernel, which is far more reliable than Windows 98 or Millennium Edition versions, which are 16-bit over 16-bit. Basically 98 and ME are fake 32 bit programs.

The major difference between 98/ME and XP is that XP (and NT4/Win2000) doesn?t allow programs to write to certain areas of the memory, because writing to the wrong areas often results in unrecoverable system crashes. If a program that you are working in crashes, it won?t cause your whole system to crash ? just use Task Manager (Alt + Ctrl + Del) to shut down the offending program.

Since I installed XP I haven't crashed once. A couple of programs had some small problems, but once I restarted them everything was fine. That means that you will never see the dreaded "Blue Screen of Death" ever again!

Windows XP also uses NT file system (NTFS). The difference between NTFS and FAT32 or FAT16 is that NTFS saves duplicate copies of the file tables in several areas of the disk so that a disk error won?t render all the information on the disk useless.

http://www.bsa.org/resources/2001-05-21.55.pdf

The most talked about feature of Windows XP is the built-in anti-piracy feature. Software piracy cost the software industry approximately $11.75 Billion in 2000 ? that?s an incomprehensible amount of money and it is understandable that Microsoft is interested in slowing it down as much as possible.

I agree that it is quite a large problem and I think it is a great idea to make it harder to copy software ? but only if it brings the price of software down.

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