Horoscope 

Free will astrology

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Were you under the impression that the sky is completely mapped? It's not. Advances in technology are unveiling a nonstop flow of new mysteries. In a recent lecture, astronomer Joshua Bloom of the University of California described the explosion of wonder. One particular telescope, for example, detects 1.5 million transient phenomena every night, and an average of 10 of those turn out to be previously undiscovered. Reporting on Bloom's work, Space.com compared astronomers' task to "finding a few needles in a giant haystack night after night." I see this challenge as resembling your imminent future, Aries. Mixed in with all the chatter and hubbub, there are some scattered gems out there -- rich revelations and zesty potentials. Will you have the patience to pinpoint them?

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): If you're thinking of calling on a ghost to provide you with information, make sure you know how to banish it when you're finished milking it. If you're considering a trek into the past to seek some consolation or inspiration, drop breadcrumbs as you go so you can find your way back to the present when it's time to return. Catch my drift, Taurus? It's fine to draw on the old days and the old ways, but don't get lost or stuck there.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): From an astrological point of view, it's a favorable time for people to give you gifts and perks and blessings. You have my permission to convey that message to your friends and associates. Let them know it's in their interest to be generous toward you. The truth, as I see it, is that they will attract rewards for themselves, some unexpected, if they help you. So what's your role in this dynamic? Be modest. Be grateful. Be gracious. At the same time, rake it all in with supreme confidence that you deserve such an outpouring.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Nobel Prizes are awarded to geniuses in a variety of fields for work they've done to elevate science and culture. But have you heard of Ig Nobel Prizes? The Annals of Improbable Research hands them out to eccentrics whose work it deems useless but amusing. For instance, one recipient was honored for investigating how impotency drugs help hamsters recover quickly from jet lag. Another award went to engineers who developed a remote-control helicopter to collect whale snot. In 2000, physicist Andre Geim won an Ig Nobel Prize for using magnetism to levitate a frog. Unlike all of his fellow honorees, however, Geim later won a Nobel Prize for his research on a remarkable substance called graphene (tinyurl.com/NobelGraphene). I think you'll soon have a resemblance to him, Cancerian. Some of your efforts will be odd and others spectacular; some will be dismissed or derided and others will be loved and lauded.

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