Indulging all artistic tastes 

Art With Heart silent auction in support of Whistler Health Care Foundation

click to enlarge Start Bidding Blake Jorgenson's photograph, 'The Japanese Tree', is one of the 20 pieces of artwork on auction for the Whistler Health Care Foundation
  • Start Bidding Blake Jorgenson's photograph, 'The Japanese Tree', is one of the 20 pieces of artwork on auction for the Whistler Health Care Foundation

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Committee members decided that for this year, at least, they would keep the art auction relatively low key, opting to invite artists they know personally, and only include 20 pieces.

“We want to make sure that this really works for the artists, and I think there’s all sorts of opportunities to grow this into a really big thing,” Adams said. She pointed out that in other communities, like White Rock and Sooke, art auctions are held as large, annual fundraising events.

“We might get to that — who knows! It’s a test case at this time, and we just want to make sure that it’s working well for everyone — that it’s not too much of a hassle for our volunteers and also that it works really well for the artists,” she explained.

The pieces up for grabs range from wearable artwork, like the stunning jewelry by local artists Borgi Rayen and Tess Klein, to the paintings and photographs of artists from throughout the province. The pieces are valued anywhere from $125 to $4,800.

Adams is hoping that each piece fetches its asking price, at the very least.

“Mostly to support the artists, because that is what their work is worth, and it’s disappointing to see it go for less,” she added.

All of the pieces will be on display at the Scotia Creek Gallery in MY Millennium Place throughout the month of October, so people can check them out, and even have the chance to place a blind bid, beforehand. Those bids will be included on the bid sheet on the night of the auction.

And if nothing on either auction block — live or silent — appeals to attendees, they’ll also have the chance to light up the “Tree of Light,” which was designed by Jim Barnum for the event. Every time a donation is made during the evening, a light will be lit on the tree.

The first Indulge event was sold out, and raised an impressive $75,000. This year, given the current precarious economic climate, Adams is more modest in her fundraising expectations; she hopes they can raise $40,000.

“We already have some very generous sponsors on board…” Adams said, pointing out that the Westin and other supporters have contributed over $25,000 in value of goods and services to help host the event.

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