Mountain News 

Pairing butts, bikes and beds

Page 4 of 5

This is based on data from June 2008 through June 2010, reports the Summit Daily News.

Of course, deed-restricted housing never had the huge gains enjoyed by free-market housing because, by definition, the deeds restrict the resale price. Many affordable housing projects restrict appreciation to three to five per cent annually. In contrast, free-market housing prices rose anywhere from two percent to 35 percent annually since 1989, the last time housing prices declined in Summit County.

What's going on? David O'Neil, developer of two affordable-housing complexes in Summit County - the Wellington Neighborhood in Breckenridge, and the Peak One Neighborhood in Frisco - says it's very simple. "We have real people, buying real homes, with real dollars. As a result, it is a very stable market." And it's a much safer investment than unrestricted market homes, he said.

 

Bakery rises from its ashes

TELLURIDE, Colo. - Baked in Telluride, like the Phoenix of old, has arisen from its ashes, opening just in time for the big bluegrass festival. The bakery, the oldest continuously operating restaurant in Telluride, having opened in 1977, burned down in February 2010. The exterior of the building looks much like the old one , reports The Telluride Watch , although ample daylighting has created an airier ambience.

 

 

Circuses no worse than

kennels or horse show

KETCHUM, Idaho - The big top was scheduled to arrive in the Ketchum-Sun Valley area last week, and one local resident contacted the Idaho Mountain News to urge a boycott because of the abuse of elephants and other circus animals.

A representative of the circus, Carson and Barnes, denied any abuse. "There are bad people out there, but it doesn't mean everyone is bad," said David Rawls.

The newspaper also talked with Ted Friend, who leads an animal well-being program at Texas A&M University. He and several students travelled with Carson and Barnes and four other circuses over the course of two years.

"There was nothing different than what we would do with horses or show dogs. It would be illogical to condemn circuses if you didn't also condemn kennels and horseback riding with trailers," Friend said.

 

Assisted-care facility gets help

BANFF, Alberta - Banff town officials have agreed to support expansion of an aging-in-place facility called Bow River Lodge. The facility, located down-valley in Canmore, is proposed to have 61 more units at a cost of $19.3 million.

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