Phoenix, take two 

Housing project resurrected by independents; Buildings could be ready in December if money secured

click to enlarge Re-Rise The Phoenix project could rise from its own ashes after an independent developer offered a new vision for the troubled housing complex
  • Re-Rise The Phoenix project could rise from its own ashes after an independent developer offered a new vision for the troubled housing complex

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Bedrooms will likely rent for $700 a month, said Jervis, although nothing is confirmed.

The buildings will go on the same site as Phoenix I — where the Whistler Racquet Club and Wildwood Bar and Bistro are located — until July 1, 2010. They will be three storeys tall with steel siding and asphalt single roofs.

One big difference between the original project and Phoenix II is that the units will not be exclusive to employees of local businesses.

“We will probably just put it to the market in general, but preference will be given to local business people,” said Jervis.

Jervis said he plans to start contacting Whistler businesses shortly about signing up for the new beds, adding that he wants to keep the lease and deposits similar to Phoenix I.

And while many of the 45 businesses involved in the first Phoenix have found alternative accommodation for their employees this winter season, Jervis thinks interest is even higher than before.

“I am getting every indication from people that they are still interested,” said Jervis, who was contracted with the Phoenix Corporation in May. His ties with the Phoenix Corporation were cut in September when the original proposal fell through. Since then, he has been independently looking for another housing possibility.

But two of the biggest businesses involved in Phoenix I — Whistler-Blackcomb and the Gibbons Group — will not ask for as many beds in the revival project.

While it is not clear how many beds Whistler-Blackcomb would be interested in, Jervis said the number is down from the 40-some beds they reserved before. And the Gibbons Group has found alternative accommodation for their employees.

Business owner Chris Quinlan, who was a major driving force with Phoenix I, also said he is not participating in the revival project.

“I have secured a two-year lease on a house,” said Quinlan. “I have 12 beds there, versus seven with Phoenix.”

And when asked if he would sign up for beds in Phoenix II, Sandy Black, owner of Affinity Sports Rental, said he did not want to comment.

“I would have to look at the deal and understand what it looks like, what the time frame looks like, what the new rent looks like, how much money they want up front, and the commitment level,” said Black, who was involved in the first housing project.

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