Second man charged in connection with McIntosh death 

A Squamish man who had manslaughter charges stayed against him five years ago now faces a new charge in connection with the beating death of Bob McIntosh.

On Aug. 28 Squamish RCMP charged Ryan MacMillan, 25, with assault causing bodily harm. He made his first court appearance Sept. 5.

Earlier in the summer Ryan Aldridge, also 25, was charged with manslaughter in connection with the McIntosh death.

The two, who were released on bail, will appear together in court on Oct. 17.

MacMillan was originally charged with manslaughter five days after the beating death of McIntosh at a Squamish New Year’s Eve party in 1997.

Nine months later police stayed the charge after witnesses changed their stories.

Throughout the five-year investigation many witnesses refused to talk to investigators in what police have called a "code of silence."

McIntosh, a 40-year-old Squamish lawyer and father of two, went to check on the New Year’s party thrown by 19-year-old James Cudmore, the son of his vacationing friend Dr. Richard Cudmore.

There were about 100 people at the party.

RCMP say McIntosh was repeatedly hit or kicked in the head in one of the bedrooms, where several people witnessed his death.

Police have said that based on the information they have they don’t expect any further charges will be laid.

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