Spring Cleaning in Whistler 

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Every spring as the snow begins to melt and I become less inclined to head up the mountain, I find myself with a little more time on my hands. Wandering around my house a little bored I try to muster up the ambition to do something productive. As I look around, I wonder how the heck I have accumulated so many things since the last time I did a big clean up.

At a glance of my once-very-organized "gear room," I see many things that have miraculously appeared over the past year. I've ended up with an extra pair of riding boots, six not-so pairs of mismatched gloves, too many Mardi Gras beads to feel proud of, several new pint glasses labelled with different beer brands, a spare bike tire, a set of cross country ski poles, and a broken snowshoe... and that was just at a glance.

Don't judge me too quickly because I am not the only Whistlerite who has become a gear hoarder over the past season. Whenever I find a pair of gloves abandoned in the Day Lots, I pick them up, give em' a sniff (the first test every find must pass), try them on and inevitably toss them in my trunk. Surely I know someone who will fit them, need them or want them, I think. But fast forward four months of greedily enjoying the winter season and neglecting my housework, and my place is bulging with stuff like that I don't need.

Spring cleaning isn't very fun but neither is the rainy dead season. You just have to get through it knowing there is more good to come. I've come up with six ideas for your annual Spring Cleaning to keep you busy and help you organize your life: fix it, clean it, store it, dump it, sell it and swap it. Check out these ideas and apply them liberally to better your life in Whistler.

1. Fix It

I break a lot of stuff. In fact, piles of stuff. My husband says it's because I'm careless. I say that it's because I operate at speeds that would rival that of an ostrich in full stride. Well this year, instead of letting those piles get bigger, I have decided to try to fix all the things I have broken (and maybe learn to fix the things I will probably break in the future).

Some fixes don't require a lot of tools. For example, I've noticed a trend of baggy pants in Whistler (What? You haven't noticed? The pants got skinny for a while but now the prisoner look is back). I know I can't change this fashion faux pas (although if I could, I would pull up everyone's pants enough at least to cover their undies) but at least I can help make it look more together. The problem with baggy pants is what I like to call the "dreaded cuff drag." I see tattered ski pants, jeans and yoga pants being abused with every step as the cuffs are dragged through puddles and dirty, over patio stones and eventually worn as stirrups. I even saw a kid get his ripped cuffs caught in the stairs walking up to Base II. As he struggled to get them loose and still maintain his cool, I thought to myself, boy, this guy could sure make his life easier if he just had his pants hemmed. A needle and thread can take care of this in about five minutes, a stapler in about five seconds (if you're going to throw the pants away anyway) and a roll of duck tape even faster if that fits your style.

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