The perfect shot 

Evolution of mountain biking industry through the eyes of Sterling Lorence

click to enlarge Big Drop Matt Hunter does a tabletop in Kamloops, B.C. Photo by Sterling Lorence
  • Big Drop Matt Hunter does a tabletop in Kamloops, B.C. Photo by Sterling Lorence

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He points out that he has spent 36 years getting to know the ins and outs of the province’s beautiful forests, which is a huge selling feature for his clients.

But Lorence stresses that he doesn’t just capture professional riders making 60-foot drops – beyond the hardcore mountain bike scene, he uses his lens to capture other things, whether it be trail running or a Toyota Tacoma ad in Whistler.

Though he’s based out of Vancouver now, Lorence has some strong ties to Whistler. He grew up skiing here, and spends a lot of time shooting throughout the Sea to Sky region.

He recently did a shoot with Gary Fisher Bikes, which reinforced how much the province has to offer in the way of diverse natural surroundings.

“We had five days to do 11 different bikes for their catalog, and…day one we were in Pemberton, up getting Mount Currie in the background, right through to shooting the sickest forest shots in Squamish… and then on the last night we were in Merritt, up in the Nicola Valley, up in the rolling grassland hills there with the firing sunset,” he said.

Within three hours, they were able to access some dramatically different scenery.

“I’m not planning on moving anytime soon,” Lorence said with a laugh.

That said, his career has taken him all over the world. He’s been to Morocco, Africa, the Canary Islands, Hawaii, and other countries to shoot. Right now the world wants to see B.C., so he has the option to stick close to home.

For the month of August, beginning this Saturday, Lorence will be exhibiting a wide range of his work at the Blake Jorgenson Gallery in Whistler.

“It makes me feel pretty fortunate to have Blake give me the call to be one of the people that gets to be in his gallery,” Lorence said, “That’s obviously an honour, being alongside him, because I certainly respect his work and what he does.”

He has selected pieces that he hopes will appeal to the diverse crowd that frequents Whistler, not just the hardcore mountain bike industry professionals — showing new work alongside shots from the beginning of his career, and showcasing B.C. and other places photography has taken him over the years.

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